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Visa's

Visas are the responsibility of the traveller. It is best to consult with the high commission of the country being travelled to in the country being travelled from as requirements vary and change constantly. Botswana Safaris will not be held responsible for any incomplete or incorrect information regarding the visa process gathered by the traveller.

Visa Regulations

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A CULTURAL EXCURSION THAT INFORMS AND EMPOWERS

One of the best ways to learn more about a country is to experience its culture. A village tour while on board one of our luxury houseboats will take you by tender boat to a local Namibian village called Ijambwe, situated on the floodplains of the East Caprivi. Meet village elders and locals and gain a greater understanding of how the inhabitants of this 100-year old village live, including their daily challenges and traditions.

Wear a large sun hat and apply sun lotion, bring a bottle of water with you and wear comfortable shoes. You’ll start by taking a slow, non-strenuous but sandy stroll through the village as you snap a few photographs and meet the Headman of the village as well as his children. The men of the village either fish to provide meals for their families, while the women and younger children perform the chores and produce handmade crafts. Pick up a woven basket, beaded jewellery or a carved wooden animal as a memento from your trip – sales of these crafts empower village inhabitants by helping them earn a living. If you want to give the children of the village gifts, bring along school stationery, books or clothing – all will be highly appreciated. Finally, enjoy a display of traditional dancing and singing at the end and join in the fun!

Chobe Princess guests can also go on a walking tour to a 2000-year-old baobab tree where you'll learn more about the medicinal and spiritual value of Impalila Island’s flora. For our more adventurous guests, if you have the inclination to climb the tree, you’ll be rewarded with a bird’s-eye view of the meeting place of two rivers and four countries.